About Time

October 27, 2013 at 8:59 pm | Posted in Film Review | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , ,

There is a familiar feel to this Richard Curtis film: the streets of London; kitchens, hallways, and bathroom from Notting Hill; and understated Brits. Somehow this film just picks up from many of Curtis’ other films – its like putting on a pair of old slippers.

Warning: plot elements revealed.

At the start, Tim, played by Domhnall Gleeson, learns that the men in his family can travel in time. The rest is a light examination of love, morality, and life. There is an element of Groundhog Day, as Tim wins over the love-of-his-life – Mary, ably played by Rachel Adams. Bill Nighy does his usual understated best, as Tim’s dad.

Tim’s dad’s secret is to live everyday twice: the first time is like a technical rehearsal, the second time minimises the bad and focuses on the good. It is no wonder the family lives in Cornwall and is always having long idilic teas on the beach.

The film doesn’t have a villain – yet manages to deal with conflict and bad choices without one. Tim executes a major intervention in his sister’s life (timeline) when she starts to spiral downwards: he makes sure Kit Kat, played by Lydia Wilson, never meets her not so good for her boyfriend. Tim also learns that when you change time, you change many things – some bad things go away, but some good things can too.

Thus when Tim’s dad is diagnosed with cancer the two men do nothing: any time adjustment that is likely to save dad, will also erase the last 21+ years of family life. The film does a wonderful job of portraying the love and respect between a father and a son without either man having to wade through rivers of blood or enduring mass suffering.

In the end, it is about living your life, and enjoying the joyful moments – time travel is not necessary.

On the face of it, it is a film about time, but really its about life.

A lovely film; go see it.

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: