Le Ride

January 17, 2017 at 7:48 am | Posted in Film Review, Uncategorized | 1 Comment
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I went to see this film of  Philip Keoghan‘s documentary of his recreation of the 1928 Tour de France. The film tells two stories: the remarkable Australasian team who rode in 1928; and Keoghan’s ride of the ‘same’ route in 2013.

Keoghan is inspired by the 1928 ride of New Zealander Harry Watson and three Australians (Hubert Opperman, Percy Osborn, and Ernest Bainbridge) who competed in that year’s Tour de France. This was in a time when teams normally numbered 10 riders; the Australasians would have to work three times as hard on comparatively primitive bikes – they weighed twice model road bikes and the derailleur gears were still two years away.

Keoghan was so inspired that he decides to ride on the original route, to the same timetable – that is 28 days. Keoghan and his friend, Ben Cornell, procure original 1928 bicycles via the Internet, recondition them, spend at least a year scouting their eventual route, training, getting sponsorship, assembling a team of friends and family, and then doing the ride.

Keoghan and Cornell faced a number of significant challenges: the pair are significantly older than cycling professionals, they can’t train at the intensity and manner that professionals can, because they have day jobs; their bikes for all intents and purposes do not have gears; and there are only two of them, so they cannot rest at the back of a team.

The duo must cycle an average of 150 miles a day, if they are to complete the ‘course’ in the target time; some days they will cycle 200 miles; some days they will cycle for 23 hours. The 1928 route was a circumnavigation of the France’s borders, but starting and stopping in Paris.This includes a stage through the Pyrenees mountains and another through the French Alps! The duo did not take rest days!! they can’t ride the original route, because much of it has been turned into motorways; and despite scouting, getting lost seemed a constant threat. The duo are able to utilise the original start and finish lines. Along the way, local riders ride occasionally ride with them and guide them.

The 1928 era bikes weighed twice as much as the modern bikes that our dynamic duo are use to. The greatest physical challenge is that while the bikes have gears, to change gear requires the rider to stop, get off, detach and re-attach the chain on a different cog!

It is an amazing feat: two middle aged men of above fitness ride 3,400 miles in 28 days. Over some of the most physically challenging terrain for cycling.

It is a great feel good movie: a lighthearted documentary about the duo’s adventure; and a fitting celebration of the original team of four Australasians.

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La Grande Boucle (Tour de Force)

September 1, 2014 at 11:00 pm | Posted in Film Review, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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I went to see this film set around the Tour de France last week, and really enjoyed it.

Clovis Cornillac plays François Nouel – a man obsessed with ‘Le Tour’. It must be many a French boy’s dream to take part in ‘Le Tour’, and François never let go of his dream. François works in a cycle store (part of an global chain of stores); his garage is a ‘bike room’. When events conspire against him and he ends up loosing his job, his wife, his son, and his sobriety, it seems the most natural thing to go for bike ride.

It just so happens that ‘Le Tour’ starts near his town and he ends up riding on the course – one day early. Despite feeling awful (hungover) he manages to finish the section. And decides that he will do ‘Le Tour’ one day ahead of the official riders: having lost everything, he can do anything.

So one ordinary man’s attempt to ride ‘Le Tour’ becomes the film and the vehicle for showing what is good and back about sport and professional sport. At first it is all about the ride – his ride. But he builds up a following – first word of mouth, then national television – and next thing you know he has sponsorship; so much so that he has obligations again! François becomes a mobile billboard – just like his heros! The professionals are a little piqued, but the big sponsors and ‘Le Tour’ are not amused at all. Even drug doping gets a look-in.

Some of the scenery is magnificent. The effort required to ride day in and day out is staggering. This requires the biggest suspension of dis-belief, can a slightly chubby, albeit cycle-fit middle age man ride every day for 20-odd days covering 3,500 km, sleeping in a tent, and relying on the help strangers (in lieu of a support team)? But who cares – films are dreams given form.

Along the way François: re-discovers himself, gets his son back, gets his wife back, and fulfills his most cherished dream.

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