Giselle (RNZB 2016)

August 15, 2016 at 8:25 am | Posted in Ballet Review, Dance Review | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Royal New Zealand Ballet has re-staged it’s Johan Kobborg and Ethan Stiefel choreographed 2012 production of Giselle.

There have been some tweaks – there is now a clever front projection to create the extensive roots of a tree that appear to move.

Lucy Green dances the part of Giselle. Her solo during the wedding was technically strong – all the pointe work was precise and steady; yet she conveyed the image of a young girl in love. She continued this mix of technique and artistry in the second Act – to save an unworthy Albrecht. 

Qi Huan, as Albrecht, reprising his role from 2012. Once again his leaps and jumps were breath taking high; his turns fast and precise. The struggle to dance all night was well conveyed. He got a well deserved big round of applause after an astonishing number of back to back entrechats.

Clytie Campbell was as Myrtha – the Queen of the Willis.

Ben Chown gave a good characterisation of the gamekeeper; he was the ‘country’ to the Prince’s polished. This was to foreshadow the final outcome when they were caught out in the woods after dark in the second Act.

A must see.

 

NZSD: INSIGHT Studio Performance (September 2014)

September 30, 2014 at 6:51 am | Posted in Ballet Review, Dance Review, Show Review | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

I went to the second of two studio performances, held by the New Zealand School of Dance, the other night, and was really glad.

The one hour, gold coin donation, performance started with the NZSD Scholars (who are 14 or younger) dancing to ballet Etudes. Which set the scene for Balanchine’s Concerto Barocco a little later. The programme was predominately a classical one, with excepts from Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty, La Fill Mal Gardee,and Nutcracker.

I was most impressed by Wan Jia Jing dancing the Siegfried’s Variation from Act III of Swan Lake. He was powerful, controlled, precise, and looked princely.

Everyone was impressed by Tirion Law dancing the role of Princess Aurora in the Rose Adage from Act I of Sleeping Beauty. She handled Pablo Aharonian’s difficult staging with aplomb: Tirion did eight, rather than the usual four, arabesques on pointe, in two passages of four – one with each suitor. She was rock solid – most impressive. The audience was fortunate to see such a staging and such a dancer – because this is one piece that will not be in the end of year production. Hopefully, it was all captured by the camcorder, and Ms Law can use it for applications.

Generally, it appears the students have benefited for Qi Huan (formerly a soloist with the Royal New ZealNd Ballet) and Turid Revfiem (former ballet mistress with the Royal New Zealand Ballet) joining the staff at the School of Dance.

Tutus on Tour (2013)

October 26, 2013 at 9:25 pm | Posted in Ballet Review, Dance Review, Show Review | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I went to the Friday performance of the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s 2013 season of Tutus on Tour at the St James Theatre (in Wellington).

The show opened with Flower Festival at Genzano – ably danced by Lucy Green and Jacob Chown. The choreography by August Bournoville exhibits the classic footwork and fast leg movements of the Danish school. Opening with this piece is an excellent way for the company to re-introduce itself to an audience it might only perform for every 2-4 years.

Through to you, choreographed by Andrew Simmons, danced by Antonia Hewitt and Qi Huan, also caught my attention. There seemed to be a nice connection between Hewitt and Huan – with Huan showing a lyrical side of himself.

The First Act finished with a pas de deux from Don Quiote danced by Clytie Campbell and Brendan Bradshaw. This showcased some trademark Marius Petipa choreography: I’m afraid I succumbed and tried to counted the number of fouettes – 16 (?).

The Second Act was a wonderful adaptation of Peter and the Wolf. Persona dramaticus:

  • Peter – Rory-Fairweather-Neylan
  • Sister/Bird – Tonia Looker
  • Father/wolf – Qi Huan
  • Duck – Yang Liu
  • Cat – Clytie Campbell
  • Grandmother – Alayna Ng

The action all takes place in Peter’s bedroom. Tania Looker is fantastic bird; Clytie Campbell is a cat through-and-through; Yang Liu is was a great  duck – I thought her bill would have been better placed on her forehead, rather than her nose :-). All three looked wonderful en pointe. Being in Wellington, the Wellington Orchestra provided an excellent live music element.

The narration was done by Te Radar; I wonder who narrates for the other half of the company?

The 2013 season of Tutus on Tour has something for everyone, and Act II is for the child in everyone.

Made to Move

February 28, 2013 at 9:03 am | Posted in Ballet Review, Show Review | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I went to the opening night of the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Made to Move, last night at the St James.

Made to Move premiered three works commissioned by the Company:

  • The Anatomy of a Passing Cloud – by Javier de Fruitos
  • Of Days – by Andrew Simmons
  • Bier Halle – by Ethan Stiefel

I was struck by Of Days: lyrical choreography, sparse lighting,(leaving much of the stage in a warm darkness), switches of lighting and drops (changing the viewers’ gross perspective, highlighting some dancers, and removing other dancers), combined with phrases and words projected onto the background. The orchestral music was light and complemented the dancers on the stage.

Abigail Boyle, with her dancing and presence, stood out in both The Anatomy of a Passing Cloud and Of Days. Medhi Angot, also stood out in both works.

Bier Halle was a fun piece that show cased the dancers. Gillian Murphy was amazing: she made everything look effortless and light; she went from motion to stillness (en pointe)) with no discernible transition; her dancing was technically precise; she casually threw in lots of fouettes! Qi Huan reached new heights: entrechats from second position; and did a series of ‘russians’ to complete a circle!! Paul Matthews and Kohei Iwamoto got to do a comic turn. Jacob Chown and Dimitri Kleioris were the ‘young males’ turned by the flirting Antonia Hewitt and Clytie Campbell – nice forward rolls. Jacob and Dimitri also got to skull two pints (each) on stage!

Genee 2012

December 16, 2012 at 3:30 am | Posted in Ballet Review, Dance Review, Event Review, Exhibition Review, Show Review | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I went to the final night of the Genee International Ballet Competition 2012 last night. It was a very enjoyable night. Some of the best young dancers produced by the Royal Academy of Dance (RAD) syllabus were competing for the top accolades in the RAD world. It was a truly international competition with semi-finalists from Australia, Japan, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines, Spain, England, Scotland, South Africa, and of course New Zealand.

The semi-finals (which I did not attend) and the finals were held at the St. James Theatre in Wellington New Zealand. The competition was hosted by the New Zealand of Dance and the Royal New Zealand Ballet.

Each competitor – ‘candidate’ – danced: a compulsory piece choreographed especially for the competition; a piece they choreographed; and one chosen by them from a limited selection classical repertoire.

I am told it has become the tradition for the Genee to have new work created for the competition. This year, Adrian Burnett – a Kiwi – choreographed two short dances, for this competition: Exalto (for female candidates) and Homage to Bach (for male candidates). I found these to be intricate / tricky looking pieces: as if designed to offer opportunities to slip-up. The way one would design a golf course or an eventing cross country course. The grand jete, from one step, at the very end of Exalto seemed especially challenging.

The “dancer’s own” works were quite varied, though mainly neo-classical, there were some lyrical classical styled pieces. This was an opportunity for the candidates to express themselves and showcase abilities not required in the other two dances. The two eventual gold medal winners had neo-classical works.

The limited repertoire was another test of the candidates skills and ability.

Throughout, the very knowledgeable audience was wholesome in its support and applause.

Then while the jury conferred, there was a surprise (for me at least) guest performance of excerpts from Swan Lake by Abigail Boyle and Qi Huan from the Royal New Zealand Ballet. The audience was treated to a virtuoso performance. The audience had given some pretty ‘big hands’ for some of the candidates, but surely Qi Huan got an even bigger hand for his Siegfried – amazing amplitude and control; and when Abigail Boyle did all those amazing fouettes – I lost count around 29 – the applause was deafening!

Then it was time for the jury to announce the medals. the jury was headed up by David McAllister, Artistic Director of the Australian Ballet; Christopher Hampson, Artistic Director of the Scottish Ballet; and Li Cunxin, Artistic Director of the Queensland Ballet.

Congratulations to: Gold Medal: Aurelian Child-de-Brocas (male), Montana Rubin (female) Silver Medal: Harry Davis (male), Kaena Ahern (female), Ariana Hond (female). And to the other finalists: Anyah Siddall, Sana Sasaki, Georgina Hills, Olivia James-Baird, Isobelle Dashwood, Emma McBeth, and Kelsey Stokes.

A nice touch was that the semi-finalists were listed in the programme and also took in the medal presentations.

Giselle (RNZB, 2012)

November 8, 2012 at 9:21 am | Posted in Ballet Review, Dance Review, Show Review | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I went to the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s new production of Giselle. Johan Kobborg and Ethan Stiefel have done an excellent job of the choreography.

It was great – well worth a look: the principals were great, the choreography had innovation, the standard of dancing very high, and sets and lighting well suited to the story.

Gillian Murphy was a sublime Giselle. She, Murphy, was technically flawless – subtle, light, flexible, yet strong and fast when necessary. Her solo during the wedding was astonishing – drawing gasps of admiration from the audience. Her dancing as a Wili – floating about – was just so.

Qi Huan, as Albrecht, was a revelation. His leaps and jumps were breath taking high. His strength and stamina was there for all to see as Albrent danced and danced all night – making it to the dawn, and life, as the Wilis retired. He got some very big rounds of applause.

Abigail Boyle aloof and imperious as Myrtha – the Queen of the Wilis. She produced strong spirt that floated about the forest.

Lucy Green and Medhi Angot were well paired as the wedding couple.

I liked that every peasant lifted his partner so that they could catch the bride’s flowers. It was nice Kiwi touch – like rugby locks being lifted in the lineout, or a goal keep being lift by the goal defence to block a shot in netball.

The second act was my favourite – with all the action and drama concentrated on the main protagonists and the supernatural action in the forest.

The Company seems to have upped its game all across the board – well done.

Leaps & Sounds

June 20, 2012 at 9:26 am | Posted in Ballet Review, Dance Review, Show Review | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I went to see the first collaboration between the Royal new Zealand Ballet and the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra for six years, the other night at the Sir Michael Fowler Centre. It was fabulous. I am so glad I went: it was so good; and, it was free!

This was a unique collaboration; the music was from past winners of the Todd Corporation Young Composers Awards; the dances were choreographed and danced by members of the Company – accompanied by the Orchestra.

The programme was:

  • musicboxgirls, choreographed by Paul Matthews; music: Alone in the Night, composed by Matthew Childs
  • Evocation, Choreographed by Adriana Harper; Music: Evocation from the Seas, composed by Max Wilkinson
  • No Limits, choreographed by Qi Huan; Music: Tales of Greece suite III, composed by Christina Reid
  • 4 + 1, choreographed by Dimitri Kleioris; music: Caught in the Headlights, composed by Corwin Newall
  • Dreams of Power, choreographed by Sam Shapiro; music:Dreams of Power, composed b y Umar Zakaria
  • Feral, choreographed by Jaered Glavin; music: Feral, composed by Robbie Ellis
  • [Inner], choreographed by Brendan Bradshaw; music: [Inner], composed by Alex Taylor
  • wind from us, choreographed by Kohei Iwamoto; music: The Persistence of our Youth, composed by Umar Zakaria

A number of items stood out. In Evocation, a pas de trois, choreographer Adriana Harper ably used  ballet’s powerful lyrical palette to deliver an – err – evocative dance. In No Limits, Qi Huan, showed a masculine touch, using strong lines and powerful lifts ably executed by Jacob Chown, Helio Lima, and Paul Matthews.

Dreams of Power brings boxing to dance. This too was a very masculine work – showing the warm-up and a short impactful fight. It was stylised yet very real.  The programme had this as a fight/dance between a man and a woman dancer, but in the evening session, the two parts were danced by men. I imagine it would have been even more powerful had it been danced by a man and a women – though potentially unsuitable for a general audience with children.

Feral was an abstract zany piece that explored the androgynous potential of dance. The dancers wore flesh coloured unitards that covered their faces and head, and confused the audience with ridiculous pony tails. At times I found myself laughing for no apparent reason!

wind from us, was witty and funny. Four men courted the favours of a lady, while occasionally breaking wind! Yang Liu, the object of their attentions, was, at times, treated as a human ribbon! The costumes were also very clever – two colours, one across the colour wheel from the other.

The SIr Michael Fowler centre turned out to be a good venue; the Orchestra conducted by Pieter Inkinen filled the auditorium with a full yet soft quality of music.

I would have gladly paid the normal triple-bill ticket price. Maybe some of the pieces could be included in future triple-bill tours. I think the Company and the Orchestra sold itself short by not charging – there wasn’t even a koha kete.

This wonderful fusion of choreography and music was what I was expecting when I went to see Rock the Ballet.

Sleeping Beauty (RNZB 2011)

October 30, 2011 at 7:58 am | Posted in Ballet Review, Show Review | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I went to the second night of the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s new production of Sleeping Beauty.

This is a new production, and in his first full-length choreographic work, Craig Horsman has tweaked and shortened the Russian version a little bit. The traditional second and thirds Acts have been combined into one. It becomes clear why the Black Fairy – Carabosse – was not invited: the Chancellor – Catalabutte – deliberately ripped up the invitation. Another innovation was the use of a shadow show to portray the birth of Princess Aurora. And for good measure the Chancellor is a cat ! – as his love interest; this cleverly elevates the Puss in Boots and White Cat characters from the original Ivan Vsevolozhsky story.

The feline antics of Catalabutte (danced by Shannon Dawson) and Lady Florine (danced by Lucy Balfour) added some lighter touches to what is otherwise a courtly ballet.

Being a new production the costumes and set were wonderfully detailed. The mortals got richly detailed customs and the fairies light etherial outfits.

The ‘good’ fairies are pretty much as you would expect to find them: simple chiffon tutus in light colours. Even the Lilac Fairy has a simple arrangement. I thought that she should have counterpointed the Black Fairy in a more visual way.

I think the best costume and character was the Black Fairy – Carabosse – danced by Maree White. She did a fantastic job; the choreography, personalisation, and costume seem to borrow heavily from von Rothbart in Swan Lake. The Black Fairy is dressed in black, looking a little bit like Charlize Theron in Aeon Flux with a massive black cape; she is the only fairy to have a head piece, but no wings. She has her own retinue of hench-goblins to boot. She even turns into a dragon – curtesy of Weta Workshop – when she fights Prince Desire.

I wish the fight between the Prince and Carabosse was a bit longer, so that the drama and tension cab build. But it was a nice deviation from the standard ‘cutting through the vines’ when it came time for the Prince to ‘rescue’ the Princess.

I was also wish that the four princes, from whom Aurora was originally to select a husband, had solos of their own.

I was disappointed that the Stella Abrera and Sergio Torrado were not in the principal roles. Instead, the cast was ably lead by Abigail Boyle and Qi Huan. Qi Huan is most princely – with well controlled jumps, leaps and turns. Abigail Boyle handles her technically demanding role well. The evergreen Sir John Trimmer plays the King. The dancing of Adriana Harper and Medhi Angot as the Bluebirds was wonderful.

While the story is relatively simple, I found the beautiful produced programme very useful for filling in some of the ‘gaps’. I though the wedding could have more visual ‘handrails’. [It certainly pays to read up on the story.]

The cast got a resounding ovation at the final curtain.

Romeo and Juliet – 2008

August 27, 2008 at 7:18 am | Posted in Ballet Review, Show Review | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I was originally not going to see this ballet, a trial viewing of a DVD recording of a more classic version, resulted in a decision not to go. But I at the end of the show I was glad I went.

Aug 24, 2008 by Show_Hanger

This ballet was originally choreographed by Christopher Hampson in 2003 for the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s 50th Anniversary. The setting and costumes are not the classic 17th century setting; instead the setting is more contemporary – post 19th century. Hampson has recast the story somewhat and given it some deeper nuances. The work is one that one might have expected from Matthew Bourne – with the greatest repect to both choreographers; it is a throroughly modern ballet.

The Capulets and Montagues have been cast onto two sides of a class divide. The Capulets are shown in wealthy circumstances – all be it with some serious street muscle on-call. The Montagues are hardly shown at all; they may have money, but Romeo (Qi Huan) seems to have the run of the streets – maybe he just feels more comfortable away from the more confining surrounds of his unseen family. The clash between the Caplulets and the Montagues is subtly subverted into a clash between the free spirits of the streets and the constricted family setting of honour and duty.

Tybalt is portrayed brilliantly, by Paul Mathews, as an angry young man consumed by the need to protect his family honor. As such he is very much the force driving the conflict, and is the catalyst of much of the violence. He was the one who supplied the forboding menace on the streets and at the Capulet family ball. So it comes a bit of a surprise to see him killed by Romeo.

Romeo and his two companions (Mercutio and Benvolio) come across as a set of self absorbed young men looking for diversion and some fun mischief – fairly harmless and annoying. Baiting Tybalt and his street heavies; siding with the people who can’t really stand up to them, seems like a bit of heroic fun, that eventually leads to Mercutio’s accidental slaying.

Romeo is not really interested in revenge, but Tybalt drives him into a frenzy and he is killed.

Juliet (Katie Hurst-Saxon) has the hardest role: she is still young, but expected to take on some of the duties of an adult – her family expect her to marry Paris, perhaps to cement a wider family alliance; she is loyal to her family; she marries against her family’s wishes – in secret; Romeo kills Tybalt – her older cousin, and a favourite; she loves Romeo, on and on and on. Juliet and her two friends are the innocents in this story. They have a nurse (Turid Revfeim) who’s job is to look after and protect them. Nurse is probably the one human figure in the household. Juliet’s parents seem to be duty bound figures.

Juliet is ultimately torn by duty and love, and seeks a third way out – she will fake her suicide. And so the young lovers kill themselves due to that fateful mis-delivered message. (Surely, a phone company or courir company will us this as the basis for an advertisement – ‘use X when that message has to get there on time’!)

Hampson injects a new sub-plot: Lady Capulet and Tybalt are secretly lovers! Here we see a facet of the adult world that Juliet tragically never discovers. Juliet’s own mother shows that duty can be worn like a suit of clothes – put on in public and taken off in private. Juliet should have married Paris and met very discretely with Romeo!

Hampson cleverly puts Juliet and her friends on point, and no one else, to emphasize their innocent nature.

Sir Jon Trimmer (Friar Lawrence) and Turid Revfeim turn in wonderful performances to give their characters some depth. Gary Harris and Greg Horsman even put charming cameo roles – as monks. Jo Funaki got the biggest round of applause – for his portrayal of the mischevious Mercutio – during the curtain call.

Tracy Grant Lord’s set was clever and created the right atmosphere – well up to meeting the challenge of creating: street scenes, a grand ball, Juliet’s bedroom, a church, and a tomb. A stair case does wonderful quadruple duty. Verona must be truly a magical place because it was just massive.

Christopher Hampson’s Romeo and Juliet is accessible, without being shallow.

0.3

My only disappointment was that I did not get to see Amy Hollingsworth and Cameron McMillan dance in the lead roles. So much of the production publicity had been crafted around them. Given my DVD fueled misgivings of Romeo and Juliet, I went because I wanted to see them dance.

I went on the last night of the season, so if you missed it, catch it in 3-4 years when it comes around again.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.